Naso

Posted on May 20th, 2018

NUMBERS 4:21−7:89 


by Daniel Nevins for JTS
Lifting Up Our Communities


"What task makes you nervous?" You may be surprised by my answer—making synagogue announcements. During my years as a congregational rabbi, I enjoyed public speaking, whether to a small minyan or to a full sanctuary. But standing up at the end of tefillah and making announcements was always a challenge. I wanted to give warm but equal acknowledgement to all who had contributed to the service, as well as to those who had played the many roles necessary to help the shul function. Both volunteers and staff deserved recognition. There were milestones to celebrate, mourners to comfort, and programs to promote.

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Bamidbar

Posted on May 13th, 2018

Numbers 1:1−4:20 


BY MATTHEW BERKOWITZ, JTSA.edu
A Slow Walk to Freedom


With this coming Shabbat, we begin the fourth book of Torah known as the book of Numbers or Bemidbar. Having occupied ourselves with the details of the priests, purity, and ritual, we now turn our attention to the Israelite wanderings in the desert. Notably, Parashat Bemidbar is obsessed with order: a census, Levitical duties, and the spatial arrangement of the Israelite encampment. We read the extensive list of names, exact numbers of those belonging to each tribe, and the precise location of each tribe in relation to the Tabernacle. How are we to understand and grasp this obsession with order in the desert?

Rabbi Shmuel Avidor HaCohen explains:

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Behar-Bechukotai

Posted on May 6th, 2018

Leviticus 25:1-27:34 


Academy for Jewish Religion


“G’d’s Nearness is a Promise”
By Rabbi Elisheva Beyer, RN, MS, JD, ’06

Bechukotai tells us of G-d’s promises for following His commandments and consequences for failing to do so.  The parsha opens with, “Bechukotai tale’chu,” which translates as, “If you go in My chukim….” “Chukim” (plural) or “chok” (singular) has several meanings. 

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EMOR

Posted on April 29th, 2018

Leviticus 21:1−24:23 

 

BY LAUREN EICHLER BERKUN for JTS
SACRED HISTORY


As we stand in the midst of Sefirat Ha-Omer, the period of counting 49 days from Pesach to Shavuot, we read the very parashah which contains the instructions for this count. Parashat Emor teaches:

"From the day on which you bring the sheaf of elevation offering–the day after the sabbath–you shall count off seven weeks. They must be complete: you must count until the day after the seventh week–fifty days; then you shall bring an offering of new grain to the Lord" (Lev. 23:15).

This selection from parashat Emor is traditionally recited each night of the Omer before the ritual counting. However, while the biblical text is explicit about our need to count, the reason for counting is a mystery. The rabbis of the Talmud understood this period as a countdown to Matan Torah, God's gift of the Torah at Mount Sinai.

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Acharei Mot-Kedoshim

Posted on April 22nd, 2018

Leviticus 16:1-20:27 


BY STEPHEN A. GELLER, from JTS
Separation and Union: The Poles of Holiness


These combined parashiyot are complex in their structure and content, yet a careful examination of these chapters reveals a striking and powerful theological insight. In terms of Bible scholarship, they extend across a major divide in the priestly literature: Leviticus 16 describes the detailed rites of yearly atonement that eliminated the taint of sinfulness from the priesthood, shrine, and people. In essence, it is a kind of re-creation of the initial state of purity of the Tabernacle on the day it was dedicated, as described in Leviticus 9-10. The link between atonement and dedication is made subtly, by the reference at the beginning of Leviticus 16 to the tragic deaths of Aaron’s sons, Nadab and Abihu, at the dedication of the Tabernacle, as recounted in Leviticus 10. The first part of the parashah therefore should be read as a continuation of the first half of Leviticus, chapters 1-15, which describe the establishment of sacrifice and cult. The dominant themes are purity and forgiveness, which are given as the purpose of all the types of sacrifice.

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